Last formal Blog

7 05 2010

And now the end is near… my last assignment of year 1 of being a journalist is a blog about the experience of studying multimedia journalism. Jim asked me in an interview what would be my ideal job in ten years time and I replied that I would love to be a political correspondent for one of the broadsheets. Oh how things have changed.

The reason for that change has been multimedia journalism. From my Facebook account to my blog to my pointless tweets there is a big electronic world out there that no journalist can ignore any longer.

I met a journalist who works for The Daily Mail recently and he agrees that the web is where the future lies; we just need to figure out how to make money out of it. I still use Google News since we were introduced to it a few months back and have since passed on my knowledge to some of my drinking buddies who have set up their own accounts.

An Irish DJ died recently and quite unexpectedly and, after a friend sent me a text, I used Google News to get the facts. The worry here is it was all free, news is so much more readily available but no one is paying for it. The world has become a much smaller place and though I’ve really taken to blogging I would love to make some money out of it. The Internet has unleashed an enormous amount of uncertainty about where the future of journalism is heading but I find this prospect rather exciting and hope that by getting into the business now I might have some say in the answer to this puzzle.

It wasn’t all technical; I also honed my interviewing skills for the podcast and my approach strangers in the street skills for the vox pops.

I will not be the type of student to ignore their blog ‘til we come back in October and Jim tells us to blow the dust off and get typing; there shall be a whole summer of theory, speculation and, of course, ranting. All donations accepted.





Group Blog

6 05 2010

My overall group blog experience was a good one; this is mostly down to the fact I had the privilege of working with a motivated intelligent group of people. We limited our number to four and although there were requests to join our blog such instances were swiftly dealt with.

My job was editor and chief and then we had a production editor, a social media person and a blog page enforcer. I don’t wish to upset anybody so I shall refer to these people as Mark, Victoria and Sophia.

My task was to inspire my people to write, there would be no problem here as everyone was brimming with ideas. Mark was asked to work out a time table to make sure posts were going up every day; I don’t think he needed to worry too much on that front. Vicky got us a page on Facebook which at its peak had 61 members and, director of decorations, Sophia spent an entire day in her back garden in the sunshine setting up the page.

I’m very proud to say that a number of other blog groups told me that they thought theirs and ours was the best. The page did look wonderful and everyone was brimming with ideas. By the end of the week my most difficult task had been to decide if I should allow a couple of little swear words slip through. I love swearing and I’m very good at it but I never like to see it in print. In my capacity as the leader I chose to let the swearing go, it wasn’t gratuitous and added a certain passion/humour where it was used.

As well as my posts, which I always tried to keep to the 300 word mark, I stuck up a few cartoons and after a while began crediting them (don’t want to get sued and lose my student loan). After having it explained to me 400 times I also learned what the difference between categories and tags is, I think.

Editing posts was my other task, luckily my team were mature enough to be open minded and listen to ideas. This was very much a two way thing and our final post on Camilla Chafer was written and re-edited by all of us.

An enjoyable experience and if I was required to do another group exercise I would imagine we’d get the old team back together.





GROUP BLOGGING

3 05 2010

My overall group blog experience was a good one; this is mostly down to the fact I had the privilege of working with a motivated intelligent group of people. We limited our number to four and although there were requests to join our blog such instances were swiftly dealt with.

My job was editor and chief and then we had a production editor, a social media person and a blog page enforcer. I don’t wish to upset anybody so I shall refer to these people as Mark, Victoria and Sophia.

My task was to inspire my people to write, there would be no problem here as everyone was brimming with ideas. Mark was asked to work out a time table to make sure posts were going up every day; I don’t think he needed to worry too much on that front. Vicky got us a page on Facebook which at its peak had 61 members and, director of decorations, Sophia spent an entire day in her back garden in the sunshine setting up the page.

I’m very proud to say that a number of other blog groups told me that they thought theirs and ours was the best. The page did look wonderful and everyone was brimming with ideas. By the end of the week my most difficult task had been to decide if I should allow a couple of little swear words slip through. I love swearing and I’m very good at it but I never like to see it in print. In my capacity as the leader I chose to let the swearing go, it wasn’t gratuitous and added a certain passion/humour where it was used.

As well as my posts, which I always tried to keep to the 300 word mark, I stuck up a few cartoons and after a while began crediting them (don’t want to get sued and lose my student loan). After having it explained to me 400 times I also learned what the difference between categories and tags is, I think.

Editing posts was my other task, luckily my team were mature enough to be open minded and listen to ideas. This was very much a two way thing and our final post on Camilla Chafer was written and re-edited by all of us.

An enjoyable experience and if I was required to do another group exercise I would imagine we’d get the old team back together.





TWEET TWEET TWEET

3 05 2010

I joined Facebook, set up Google news and reader, hell I even started a blog (you’re reading it) but Jim has pushed us to the limit this time and insist his minions all sign up for Twatter, sorry Twitter.

I put a post up on FB to inform people I had a Twitter account and within hours three people had responded. I elected to follow all three and one of them was an avid tweeter. now any-time I blow the dust off my Twitter account I have a ready update off where he’s drinking coffee, what shop he might buy a shirt in, who he may meet for a pint later and on and on and on.

Sometimes I’ll get an email to inform me that a complete stranger is following me on Twitter so I pop on the site, have a look and usually tweet something about how I feel Twitter is an awful waste of life.

When we set up our account in class initially I followed BBC and Sky Sports News and the usual suspects but the big boys flood Twitter with updates and take over your homepage. This meant a more tactful approach and I selected various journalists to follow instead.

I know Sky News have a full-time Twitter correspondent which must be a frightening prospect every morning on the way to work. “Dear God I have to spend another day sifting through mountains of horse shit just in case one of these needy people happen to be near anything newsworthy.” The best example of this is the plane that flopped down in the Hudson river and all the big media companies got their images from Twitter.

But I’ve decided tweeting is not for me, I’m going to go to my Twitter account now and make that public knowledge.